Reduce Blood Pressure

Easy Ways to Reduce Your Blood Pressure

In this high paced world we live in, it is easy to get caught up in our work and have our stress levels rise without any relief. Stressful office environments such as stockbrokers, business advisers, web designers – and for that matter, many other business situations where workers are often racing the clock in order to fulfill a client’s needs – can lead to stress overloads and high blood pressure.

If you have high blood pressure you need to see a doctor. Having a quiet place outside to relax in will help to bring it down. Outdoor furniture placed under a shady tree is an ideal place to do this.

Blood pressure is one of those hidden things that either keeps us healthy – or not. When it is too high it can cause health problems such as stroke, that can have dire consequences. The trouble is that it can be too high without you ever knowing. By the time there are symptoms such as blurry eyesight, it can be at a dangerous level. In fact, many people die of a heart attack or stroke brought on by high blood pressure that they were not even aware of.

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Understanding Eating Disorders

Understanding Eating Disorders

Facts and Findings


Facts

  • More than 5 million Americans experience eating disorders.  (14)
  • Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder are diseases that affect the mind and body simultaneously.  (14)
  • Three percent of adolescent and adult women and 1% of men have anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge-eating disorder.  (14)
  • A young woman with anorexia is 12 times more likely to die than other women her age without anorexia.  (19)
  • Fifteen percent of young women have substantially disordered eating attitudes and behaviors.  (13)
  • Between 10% and 15% of those diagnosed with bulimia nervosa are men.  (1)
  • Forty percent of fourth graders report that they diet either “very often” or “sometimes.”  (8)
  • About half of those with anorexia or bulimia have a full recovery, 30% have a partial recovery, and 20% have no substantial improvement.  (10)

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Helping Your Friend With Eating Disorder

Helping Your Friend With Eating Disorder

Helping Your Friend

Please note: For ease in reading, we have used “she” and “her” in the description below even though eating disorders exist in men, women, girls, and boys. This advice is suitable for a child of either gender.

Click here if your friend is already getting help.

If your friend doesn’t admit to having a problem and/or doesn’t want help, the best way to approach her is to help her see that she needs assistance. However, you’ll need to prepare yourself well since approaching a friend with an eating disorder can be tricky.

Remember that her eating disorder is a desperate way of trying to cope with underlying problems. Even though you can see her disorder as unhealthy and unproductive, your friend may view her eating habits as a lifeline. That is why it is common for someone with an eating disorder to get upset or mad if you try to help her. She may fear that you are going to take away her only coping mechanism. She may deny the problem, be furious that you discovered her secret, or feel threatened by your caring. When you raise your concerns, give your friend time and space to think and respond.

Before approaching your friend, find out about resources for help in your community so that you can offer her a strategy to connect with that help.

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Helping Yourself With A Eating Disorder

Helping Your Child With Eating Disorders

Helping Your Child

Please note: For ease in reading, we have used “she” and “her” in the description below even though eating disorders exist in men, women, girls, and boys. This advice is suitable for a child of either gender.

First, remain calm. Approaching a child with an eating disorder can be tricky. Naturally, it is very upsetting to discover that your child might have an eating disorder. If you are panicked, talk to your pediatrician, your partner, or a trustworthy family member or friend. Avoid letting your child overhear you or see you distraught.

Find resources. Before approaching your child, you need to find out what resources are available for your child and for your family, so you can offer her a helpful strategy. Talk with your pediatrician, internist, and school counselor or nurse for information and referrals. You might want to talk to another parent who has been in a similar situation for support and information about available resources. Learn as much about eating disorders as you need to feel like an informed parent and advocate.

Meet with a referred therapist initially – without your child, but with your partner – to learn how the therapist practices and to discuss the best strategy for approaching your child. If you are feeling strong emotions such as anger towards your child, you might want to work with a therapist on your own before approaching her.

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